heresy of the week

Heresy of the Week: Star Wars’ universe needs a spring clean


star wars expanded universe luke

Heresy of the Week is a (mostly) weekly spot in which I entertain some of the unthinkable notions of geek-culture. The arguments I put forward are not always things I personally agree with, but often rhetorical devices designed to force myself (and maybe readers) out of the boxes which fan discussions can get caught in. But that aside, feel free to get yourselves worked up and your knickers in a twist if you really want to.

This week’s heresy:

In its apparently ongoing quest to sacrifice all of geek-culture’s sacred cows, Disney has announced to predictable outrage that it intends to ditch the ‘expanded universe’ which has grown up around the six films. But, once again, Disney is exactly right to do so, and if the fandom could calm itself down for five minutes, it might agree.

Read on…

Heresy of the Week: Is your film too long?


peter jackson

Heresy of the Week is a (mostly) weekly spot in which I entertain some of the unthinkable notions of geek-culture. The arguments I put forward are not always things I personally agree with, but often rhetorical devices designed to force myself (and maybe readers) out of the boxes which fan discussions can get caught in. But that aside, feel free to get yourselves worked up and your knickers in a twist if you really want to.

This week’s heresy:

The perception of cinema-goers is that films are getting longer. Over the last few decades, blockbusters in excess of two hours have topped box-office rankings, and it seems an expectation has grown up that if a film isn’t long, it isn’t good value.

Read on…

Heresy of the Week: Star Trek Into Darkness wasn’t Wrath of Khan


star trek into darkness trailer hands

Far from being a copy (in reverse) of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, Star Trek Into Darkness was the natural successor to J.J. Abrams’ 2009 Star Trek reboot, in story, tone and character.

Ah, Star Trek Into Darkness. You aren’t the most hated of films, in fact by many (myself included) you were rather enjoyed. But there were also those who complained that, by riffing heavily off arguably the franchise’s most successful Trek onto the big screen (see what I did there) it showed an unforgivable lack of originality.

Says io9’s Rob Bricken:

That’s my biggest problem with the new Star Trek — that after a requisite origin story that needlessly pulled in Leonard Nimoy, they were content to give a retread of Wrath of Khan instead of giving us anything new or unexpected…they started a whole new Trek universe, and could have done practically anything. Instead, we got a mercenary remake of the most widely known Trek story out there.

With respect to Rob, whilst he’s right about how much Abrams ignored the opportunity to really explore the alternate timeline, he’s wrong about it being a straight Wrath of Khan do-over. And here is why.

Read on…

Heresy of the Week: Season Six was Buffy at its best


buffy season six

So it’s been a while since I’ve blogged regularly about much at all. Gone, apparently, are the days when I used to churn out hundreds of words each day onto this site about, well, nothing at all. Nowadays all I seem to manage is the occasional book or film review.

Well, enough of that, I say. I miss those heady days, so in an effort to shift myself from this moribund blogging-rut I seem to have fallen into, I’m going to steal an idea straight from ConservativeHome: heresy of the week. Yet unlike the erstwhile keyboard tappers of the centre-right, I won’t be boring you all with my politics. Instead, I’ll be boring you by entertaining the unthinkables of geek culture — as a rhetorical game, if I can’t find an argument I actually buy. I’ve got a few ideas to be going on with, but I’m always open to new suggestions.

So to kick us off:

Season six of Buffy the Vampire Slayer was the shining pinnacle of Joss Whedon’s masterpiece of a TV series.

Read on…