Star Trek

Heresy of the Week – I don’t actually want a new Star Trek series


kirk and spock

Heresy of the Week is a (mostly) weekly spot in which I entertain some of the unthinkable notions of geek-culture. The arguments I put forward are not always things I personally agree with, but often rhetorical devices designed to force myself (and maybe readers) out of the boxes which fan discussions can get caught in. But that aside, feel free to get yourselves worked up and your knickers in a twist if you really want to.

This week’s heresy:

“Every Trekie wants to see Star Trek return to its original and first home, on television, including me. But despite that constant desire, a new Star Trek series, now, born out of the J.J. Abrams films, would be neither the Star Trek we want, or the Star Trek we deserve.”

Read on…

Heresy of the Week – Starfleet’s whistleblowing policy is awful


spock star trek

Heresy of the Week is a (mostly) weekly spot in which I entertain some of the unthinkable notions of geek-culture. The arguments I put forward are not always things I personally agree with, but often rhetorical devices designed to force myself (and maybe readers) out of the boxes which fan discussions can get caught in. But that aside, feel free to get yourselves worked up and your knickers in a twist if you really want to.

This week’s heresy:

“As well as having a promotions policy epitomising the worst of the nepotistic and arbitrary, Starfleet as depicted on screen has a disciplinary system which actively discourages whistleblowing and the promotion of best practice.”

Read on…

Heresy of the Week – Stafleet’s promotion system is an absurd mess


kirk speech

Heresy of the Week is a (mostly) weekly spot in which I entertain some of the unthinkable notions of geek-culture. The arguments I put forward are not always things I personally agree with, but often rhetorical devices designed to force myself (and maybe readers) out of the boxes which fan discussions can get caught in. But that aside, feel free to get yourselves worked up and your knickers in a twist if you really want to.

This week’s heresy:

“One of the biggest bugbears in J.J. Abrams’ Star Trek films is the way promotions seem to work. ‘Ranks’ are tossed about with confetti, and apparently neither length or quality of service are considered when dolling out command.”

Read on…

Heresy of the Week – Spock should have been captain of the Enterprise


kirk and spock

Heresy of the Week is a (mostly) weekly spot in which I entertain some of the unthinkable notions of geek-culture. The arguments I put forward are not always things I personally agree with, but often rhetorical devices designed to force myself (and maybe readers) out of the boxes which fan discussions can get caught in. But that aside, feel free to get yourselves worked up and your knickers in a twist if you really want to.

This week’s heresy:

“One of the biggest criticisms of J.J. Abrams’ Star Trek films has been how desperate it has seemed to get back to the “normal” of The Original Series, rather than taking the opportunity to innovate. And on that note: Spock should have been the Enterprise’s new captain.

Read on…

Heresy of the Week – Star Trek: Nemesis isn’t as bad as you think


nemesis picard and shinzon

Heresy of the Week is a (mostly) weekly spot in which I entertain some of the unthinkable notions of geek-culture. The arguments I put forward are not always things I personally agree with, but often rhetorical devices designed to force myself (and maybe readers) out of the boxes which fan discussions can get caught in. But that aside, feel free to get yourselves worked up and your knickers in a twist if you really want to.

This week’s heresy:

Star Trek: Nemesis, when it was released, received an unfairly harsh press. It has an undeserved reputation for having killed the franchise, but as a bookend to the story of the Next Generation crew, it is a lot better a film than it gets credit for.

Read on…

Heresy of the Week – Data was the point of Star Trek: The Next Generation


data mister tricorder

Heresy of the Week is a (mostly) weekly spot in which I entertain some of the unthinkable notions of geek-culture. The arguments I put forward are not always things I personally agree with, but often rhetorical devices designed to force myself (and maybe readers) out of the boxes which fan discussions can get caught in. But that aside, feel free to get yourselves worked up and your knickers in a twist if you really want to.

This week’s heresy:

“Star Trek: The Next Generation had a cast of strong characters, but the strongest, and most meaningful, of all was the android longing to be human, called Data.

Read on…

Heresy of the Week – J.J. Abrams didn’t reboot Star Trek


star trek kelvin

Heresy of the Week is a (mostly) weekly spot in which I entertain some of the unthinkable notions of geek-culture. The arguments I put forward are not always things I personally agree with, but often rhetorical devices designed to force myself (and maybe readers) out of the boxes which fan discussions can get caught in. But that aside, feel free to get yourselves worked up and your knickers in a twist if you really want to.

This week’s heresy:

Despite what many viewers, fans and commentators think, J.J. Abrams two Star Trek films haven’t in fact rebooted the franchise; they are simply new instalments of the same story.

Read on…

What’s in a title?


andromeda

As a writer — particularly a short story writer — one of the most difficult parts of creating a story is actually naming the damn thing.

So many works-in-progress and, yes, the neglected hulks of abandoned half-completed tales, bear names such as “Black Hole Story” and “Horror #17”. Not terribly exciting, I know. Usually once the beast is completed, a title does present itself, and there are the rare gems where the title falls into place during the creation process.

But no, there is a distinct art to titles, and it’s an art which I’m very much an admirer of. Not simply in fiction — though I will say that I have particular love for Heinlein’s time-travel classic “All You Zombies”, and the Hugo-nominated “From Babel’s Fall’n Glory We Fled” by Michael Swanwick — but actually I find that the titles of TV series episodes are where some of the best work is to be found.

Read on…

Heresy of the Week: A new Farscape film must be true to the show’s spirit


farscape aeryn john little d

Heresy of the Week is a (mostly) weekly spot in which I entertain some of the unthinkable notions of geek-culture. The arguments I put forward are not always things I personally agree with, but often rhetorical devices designed to force myself (and maybe readers) out of the boxes which fan discussions can get caught in. But that aside, feel free to get yourselves worked up and your knickers in a twist if you really want to.

This week’s heresy:

The news that The Jim Henson company is considering a big screen return to the world of Farscape is exciting, but Farscape is no run-of-the-mill science-fiction property. The danger is real that a rush to remake an iconic series might see what made the series special lost in translation.

Read on…